• 29 Feb, 2012
  • Transportation, Reports

Project Description

In recent years, Hamilton, Ontario has been making modifications to its truck routes and has been considering the implications of some proposed reductions in routes. Partially, the changes result from the opening of the Red Hill Valley Parkway and partially they result from a desire to reduce the impacts of trucks on certain neighbourhoods. This brief study simulates the impacts of these changes on the movements of trucks through the city.

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  • Partner:

    City of Hamilton


  • 30 Nov, 2011
  • Logistics, Reports

Project Description

Exploratory work was carried out for the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) to determine if there was potential for LCBO stores and The Beer Store (TBS) locations to be served more efficiently from the four LCBO warehouses in Ontario. Research was also motivated by the fact that the Durham warehouse was operating very close to capacity and scenarios which assigned more stores to the London warehouse were to be explored. Results showed that there appears to be significant potential to develop more efficient routes. The number of routes could be fewer with trucks filled closer to capacity. These routes would be associated with less aggregate distance travelled and therefore less emissions. Aggregate travel time would also be reduced. The results were derived taking traffic congestion patterns into account and detailed reports were developed which showed step-by-step the composition and timing of each route. The analysis was done on the basis of a "typical" two week cycle and thus did not take seasonality into account. For peak periods of the year in particular, alternative routing schemes would be required to accommodate the extra volumes.

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  • 30 Sep, 2011
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Reports

Project Description

This research was carried out for the Ontario Ministry of Transportation. The purpose of the research was to explore the concept of a freight village and provide some high level insights on the applicability of the concept in the province of Ontario. A freight village is an advanced form of logistics centre where a cluster of goods movement oriented and logistics facilities are co-located and co-ordinated to achieve synergies. Key attributes include an intermodal terminal, warehousing, manufacturing, wholesaling, logistics services and access to shared facilities, equipment and services. Centralized management and ownership and partnership between the public and private sectors are also central elements. In its pure form, a freight village can serve as an incubator for smaller logistics and related firms.

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  • Partner:

    Ontario Ministry of Transportation


  • 31 Aug, 2011
  • Environmental, Logistics, Reports

Project Description

The movement of dangerous goods is a prominent theme within the general area of goods movement. Large quantities of flammable liquids and compressed gases among other dangerous substances, move between and within our urban areas. The safety of these movements is of paramount concern. Nevertheless, there have been significant incidents that have taken place over the years resulting in loss of life and environmental damage. In order to maximize their understanding of the current situation and to achieve the highest level of emergency preparedness, the Credit Valley Conservation Authority approached MITL for research that would seek to quantify the movements of hazardous materials across the Credit Valley Watershed via the modes of road and rail. The framework that was implemented to evaluate these movements is described in detail in the linked report. The final estimate for road movements was 8.857 million tonnes of hazmat per year that interact with the watershed. For rail, the corresponding estimate is 6.442 million tonnes per year.

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  • Partner:

    Credit Valley Conservation Authority


  • 31 Jan, 2011
  • Logistics, Transportation, Reports

Project Description

Green Technology and Trucking: An Investigation of Factors Influencing Fuel Consumption Using GPS Data

This study explores factors such as acceleration and speed which impact fuel consumption for short-haul trucking – that is, the shipment of goods within 200 and 300 kilometers of a driver’s home terminal. The data used in this study were provided by Transcare Logistics Corporation, a member of the Carego Group of Companies. The data consisted of GPS records for all trips undertaken by two trucks operating for the corporation, freight information, and fuel information.

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  • Partner:

    Transcare Logistics Corporation


  • 31 Dec, 2010
  • Reports, Logistics

Project Description

MITL completed a project for the Federal Bridge Corporation which assessed the impacts of potential closures to the Champlain Bridge in Montreal. Given that the main part of Montreal is an island, the metropolitan economy is very dependent on its river crossings. Congestion in the vicinity of these crossings is already a major problem. In the event of a moderate seismic event, there is the possibility that the crossing could be closed for several years. This project studied various closure scenarios and their implications for traffic patterns and also the competitiveness of the metropolitan economy.

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  • Partner:

    Federal Bridge Corporation


  • 31 Dec, 2010
  • Urban Land Use, Reports

Project Description

This presentation, created by the McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics (MITL), paints a picture of how Hamilton, Ontario, Canada is set to evolve as a successful gateway city for Southern Ontario and beyond. This video builds on MITL's study: A Sustainable Strategy for Developing Hamilton as a Gateway.

This condensed version is narrated by the Mayor of Hamilton, Bob Bratina, and has a strong focus on Hamilton's opportunity to evolve as a gateway. The extended version (20 minutes) is narrated by Dr. Virginia Frisk and also has a Hamilton focus but is designed more for educational purposes. It goes into detail about goods movement and what a gateway is. It also contains some case studies of other successful gateway cities.


  • 30 Jun, 2010
  • Logistics, Reports

Project Description

This project was completed for Metrolinx, the provincial transportation agency for the Greater Toronto Hamilton Area (GTHA). In this work, available data sources were integrated with a computationally intensive simulation framework to estimate, on an hourly basis, the flows of light, medium and heavy commercial vehicles between over 2000 zones in the GTHA.

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  • Partner:

    Metrolinx


  • 31 Mar, 2009
  • Transportation, Reports

Project Description

For MITL’s first major research project, the City of Hamilton, Ontario was evaluated for its potential to develop further as a goods movement gateway. The research featured an extensive literature review, detailed economic impact scenarios based on assumptions about gateway oriented employment growth and related traffic and emission scenarios. The central thesis of this report was that economic development and job creation need not conflict with environmental sustainability. Development of employment lands coupled with a strong urban intensification strategy and investment in public transit infrastructure is ideal for promoting economic interaction and gateway development while minimizing congestion and transport related emissions.

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  • 30 Sep, 2008
  • Logistics, Reports

Project Description

This research was carried out for Metrolinx with a view to develop improved data on Urban Commercial Vehicle Movements (UCVM) within the GTHA. A possible survey instrument was developed and a description of possible subsequent simulation modeling was provided.

This research was carried out for Metrolinx with a view to develop improved data on Urban Commercial Vehicle Movements (UCVM) within the GTHA. A possible survey instrument was developed and a description of possible subsequent simulation modeling was provided.

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