• 11 Jun, 2019
  • Reports, Logistics, Transportation

Project Description

This report is intended to be more of a starting point than an ending point. The goal is to assist in developing a dialogue about aspects needed to help grow the Hamilton-Niagara economy. In particular, the focus is on potential improvements in aid of supply chains that are tied to Hamilton-Niagara. Three important mechanisms to help in this regard are improvements to infrastructure, policies and data. These mechanisms are central to this report. In general, the field of economic development is a large one and generally too broad for the scope of this report but there is no denying that efficient supply chains are a core aspect of better performing economies.

To assist in the creation of a dialogue, this report utilizes two main approaches. One is that we have consulted with a range of relevant private and public organizations in the region and collected their opinions based on a set of basic but revealing questions. The second is that we have reviewed a wide range of literature both within and outside the region to develop a good understanding of important background aspects. The integration of primary stakeholder sources and material derived from a wide range of secondary sources leads to the fundamental insights of the report. From a sectoral perspective,two that are quite important for this region are agri-foods and advanced manufacturing and, in fact, these sectors have been well-sampled in the consultation process.

One important note is that this process has been conceived with an underlying question of how governments can help with this region’s supply chains. Consultations that took place did not emphasize any one level of government relative to another, irrespective of the fact that this report is federally sponsored. The nature of the consultation process is such that the content of this report may reflect viewpoints that are not necessarily supported by the best available evidence.

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  • 27 Mar, 2018
  • Current Research, Transportation

Project Description

The project work seeks to achieve two overarching objectives detailed in the following subsections:

  1. To arrive at an understanding of the perceived and desired quality of HSR service from the point of view of a wide range of Hamilton residents including those who use transit regularly or not at all.
  2. To suggest a multi-criteria reconfiguration of HSR service based on the evidence of our data collection and modelling efforts.
HSR partners with McMaster University to ‘re-envision’ Hamilton transit system - Global News

The HSR has announced a partnership with McMaster’s Institute for Transportation and Logistics - 900 CHML Discussion

Media Release
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  • 16 Mar, 2018
  • Reports, Environmental, Transportation

Project Description

This report offers a review of the Ontario Green Commercial Vehicle Program (GCVP) pilot that ran from 2008-2010 and assesses whether firms can save money by investing in these environmentally friendly green technologies (anti-idling devices and alternative fuel vehicles). Results suggest that this is indeed the case. For three of the five primary technologies evaluated, the payback period for investments with GCVP support was less than three years. The report also ascertains whether there was a business case for both: (a) firms purchasing green vehicles/technologies, and (b) government providing grants to assist in their purchase. Results suggest that, even without government grants, investments in these primary vehicle technologies make sense from a financial perspective. When environmental benefits are added to the equation the decision to invest becomes more compelling.

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  • 21 Jul, 2017
  • Reports, Transportation

Project Description

The research has clearly shown that the even the most exceptional of metropolitan innovation ecosystems suffer from rather mundane transportation problems. Intra-metropolitan highway corridors in such metros are some of the busiest and most congested seen anywhere. The 50- 75km driving commute from the heart of San Francisco to the campuses of Silicon Valley can easily take two or three hours on a bad day. While most big metros have transportation problems, many of these metros have given rise to, or have enabled, transportation innovations of recent years and decades. These include electronic tolling, HOV and HOT lanes, modern inter-city bus services, high-speed rail, suburban bus rapid transit systems, advanced commuter rail systems and regional rapid transit, managed lanes and expressways and others. Many of the largest and most successful feature considerable transportation diversity: there can be multiple transit systems in place (e.g. heavy, light, and commuter rail and others). When the likes of ridesharing, taxis or short term car rentals are taken into account, there can be multiple transport providers also. These transport alternatives are important to help minimize automobile dependence, including on inter-city corridors.

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  • 21 Jul, 2017
  • Reports, Transportation

Project Description

At a high level, the purpose of the current report is to use available empirical data to test out key scenarios that were raised in the companion report. More specifically, a joint model of commuting and mode choice for an area that encompasses the Greater Golden Horseshoe region is constructed for the purposes of this report. Details involved in the process of devising and building the model are described and then the end-product is used to run scenarios which focus on the corridor between Kitchener-Waterloo and Toronto. Scenarios focus on the possible impacts of high occupancy vehicle/toll (HOV/HOT) lanes and on a potential express rail service. The focus of this report is something of a niche topic in the realm of commuting behaviour – not much has been written about innovation corridors of lengths 75 to 150km. The overall idea of the modelling and scenario effort is to build a model that reflects the current preferences and behaviours of commuters in the region and which is capable to estimate results based on testing these behaviours and preferences when new modal options for travel are made available.

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  • 27 Sep, 2016
  • Reports, Environmental, Transportation

Project Description

Drop-off programs at schools are becoming more common with school boards because of the potential reduction in vehicle and student collisions compared to a disorganized school drop-off. Across North America, the number of students who are driven to school in a personal vehicle has been rising for the past five decades, with no foreseeable change in this behaviour. A drop-off program, where parents must line-up their cars and idle, is one that is very organized; however our research has identified that this potential increased safety measure is creating potentially hazardous air quality conditions. Air pollution health effect studies’ methods and technologies are continually evolving. We have demonstrated a further refinement of air pollution exposure science that incorporates the activity patterns of people into the process of measuring exposure. Our research sets the foundation for a technique to calculate personal exposure without personal monitoring units.

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  • 09 May, 2016
  • Reports, Urban Land Use, Transportation

Project Description

For rapid transit to have a meaningful impact on shaping travel patterns in the Greater Golden Horseshoe region, new and existing rapid transit infrastructure projects must be integrated with land use planning to promote transit-oriented development (TOD). However, there cannot be a one-size-fits-all approach to TOD in the GGH. With more than 400 rapid transit stations either in existence or in various stages of planning, there is considerable diversity in station area contexts throughout the region. The present project develops and applies an innovative planning tool that distils station area characteristics into a typology of similar station types. From this, we benchmark TOD in the GGH, contrast performance with planning and policy, and perform a more detailed study of the Hamilton A-Line and B-Line LRT. View the Summary Report and the Full Report below.

Summary Report

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  • 02 May, 2016
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Current Research

Project Description

MITL seeks to estimate the net land value impacts of highway infrastructure by isolating positive benefits of accessibility from negative effects of noise and pollution. Positive net benefits provide a rationale for land value capture to fund highway projects as part of a ‘value planning’ approach.This research is being carried out for the Ontario Ministry of Transportation


  • 02 May, 2016
  • Transportation

Project Description

MITL is working with McMaster University Security and Parking Services to assess the current state of the University’s collective transportation strategy/situation including its parking capacity and will then develop a sustainable, adaptive and inclusive Transportation Demand Management Plan. Transportation Demand Management (TDM) is a general term for various strategies that increase transportation system efficiency. It gives priority to more active and/or sustainable modes such as walking, cycling, ridesharing and teleworking; particularly so under congested conditions.


  • 02 May, 2016
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Current Research

Project Description

This work is being carried out through a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant. In the past, academic researchers have tended to focus on metropolitan traffic congestion issues relating to urban sprawl and urban form, the jobs-housing balance and commuting efficiency. These efforts have been weighted primarily to economic impacts and secondarily to environmental impacts with minimal attention paid to the underlying causes of the Canadian congestion phenomenon. Over a five year period, this research will produce one of the most comprehensive examinations of congestion in Canada ever taken. Congestion in Canada will be studied in terms of how it can be measured, what causes it, what implications it has and what policies ought to be prescribed to deal with it.

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