• 09 May, 2016
  • Reports, Urban Land Use, Transportation

Project Description

For rapid transit to have a meaningful impact on shaping travel patterns in the Greater Golden Horseshoe region, new and existing rapid transit infrastructure projects must be integrated with land use planning to promote transit-oriented development (TOD). However, there cannot be a one-size-fits-all approach to TOD in the GGH. With more than 400 rapid transit stations either in existence or in various stages of planning, there is considerable diversity in station area contexts throughout the region. The present project develops and applies an innovative planning tool that distils station area characteristics into a typology of similar station types. From this, we benchmark TOD in the GGH, contrast performance with planning and policy, and perform a more detailed study of the Hamilton A-Line and B-Line LRT. View the Summary Report and the Full Report below.

Summary Report

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  • 02 May, 2016
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Current Research

Project Description

MITL seeks to estimate the net land value impacts of highway infrastructure by isolating positive benefits of accessibility from negative effects of noise and pollution. Positive net benefits provide a rationale for land value capture to fund highway projects as part of a ‘value planning’ approach.This research is being carried out for the Ontario Ministry of Transportation


  • 02 May, 2016
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Current Research

Project Description

This work is being carried out through a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant. In the past, academic researchers have tended to focus on metropolitan traffic congestion issues relating to urban sprawl and urban form, the jobs-housing balance and commuting efficiency. These efforts have been weighted primarily to economic impacts and secondarily to environmental impacts with minimal attention paid to the underlying causes of the Canadian congestion phenomenon. Over a five year period, this research will produce one of the most comprehensive examinations of congestion in Canada ever taken. Congestion in Canada will be studied in terms of how it can be measured, what causes it, what implications it has and what policies ought to be prescribed to deal with it.


  • 31 Aug, 2015
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Reports

Project Description

While traffic congestion is a regular dinner-table conversation, media topic, and features centrally into discussions of transportation policy formation, newer data sources are only beginning to be integrated into policymaking circles as means to explore, track, and shape transportation system performance. This report represents one element of a larger study on using “Big Data” – in this case from Inrix, Inc. – to study road transportation system performance in the City of Toronto, focusing on the metric of travel speed. This study integrates data and model results from several sources to identify the slowest and fastest single days in 2014(January 1 through December 31)and portions of 2011(August 8 through December 31)and 2013 (July 1 through December 31). Only the freeways are analyzed for 2011 and 2013 while the freeway and arterial networks are each assessed independently for 2014 to focus the analysis on those system components which are best tracked by the available data for each year. Results suggest four major findings when focusing on mean daily travel speeds of “typical days.” First, weekend speeds are higher than weekday speeds. Freeway speeds are on average 7 to 10 kilometers per hour faster during weekdays than during the week. Second, most of the very slowest days of the year can be explicitly matched to snow and rain events. Third, those weekdays with atypically fast mean travel speeds are on holidays. Finally, daily travel conditions are much less stable during winter months than during summer months. This appears to be due to the joint impacts of the previous two factors: holidays (on which speeds are higher) and extreme weather events (during which speeds are lower). In sum, although severe incidents which trigger broader gridlock may severely impact the experiences of many downstream system users, the most pronounced patterns in daily freeway travel conditions stem from factors which are largely outside of the purview of policymaking: holidays, weekends, and weather.

The overall study was conducted in three parts: Congested Days: The first phase identified that the single most congested days occurred on days during which there was snow or rain. While this is in many ways expected, these results illustrate the role of weather in travel conditions and demonstrate the utility of these approaches when analyzing Big Data for performance monitoring.

City Congestion Trends: The second phase estimated changes in traffic congestion over the three year period from 2011 to 2014 by looking at annual, monthly, daily and hourly variations in performance metrics, including speed, delay, and unreliability. The study found that congestion did materially grow from 2011 to 2014, but the growth was uneven and congestion was in fact lower in 2013.

Corridor Report Cards: The final phase included a set of corridor report cards for 36 corridors across the City. Corridor report cards provided comparable snapshots of changes in performance between 2011 and 2014, hourly speed profiles for typical days of the week, and measures of unreliability. Results identified uneven changes in congestion over time among City roadways and expressways.
Reports:
Congested Days in Toronto
Congestion Trends in the City of Toronto (2011-2014)

Report Cards:
McMaster Institute for Transportation & Logistics (MITL) Report Card Memo
City of Toronto - Highways
City of Toronto - Major Arterials
MTO - Highways

 


  • 31 May, 2015
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Reports

Project Description

There has been a lot of interest in recent years in "livable communities" which tend to be less auto- oriented than their low density, car dependent suburban counterparts. The "complete streets" concept has become very much associated with livable communities from the point of view of accessibility and equally accommodating the walking, cycling and transit modes as well as automobiles. The purpose of the proposed research is to assess the performance of complete street implementations in other jurisdictions, critically review what has been written on complete street concepts, and assess the applicability of the complete street concept in Hamilton with a view to how this approach might improve the vitality of certain key neighborhoods.

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  • 31 Mar, 2012
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Reports

Project Description

This study examines thirty cities in North America that have already developed light rail systems and with varying levels of success. The main objective of the work is to determine the main underlying factors which have contributed to the outcomes experienced in terms of ridership and the extent of transit oriented development. The implications for a future Hamilton LRT are discussed.

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  • Partner:

    City of Hamilton


  • 30 Sep, 2011
  • Urban Land Use, Transportation, Reports

Project Description

This research was carried out for the Ontario Ministry of Transportation. The purpose of the research was to explore the concept of a freight village and provide some high level insights on the applicability of the concept in the province of Ontario. A freight village is an advanced form of logistics centre where a cluster of goods movement oriented and logistics facilities are co-located and co-ordinated to achieve synergies. Key attributes include an intermodal terminal, warehousing, manufacturing, wholesaling, logistics services and access to shared facilities, equipment and services. Centralized management and ownership and partnership between the public and private sectors are also central elements. In its pure form, a freight village can serve as an incubator for smaller logistics and related firms.

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  • Partner:

    Ontario Ministry of Transportation


  • 31 Dec, 2010
  • Urban Land Use, Reports

Project Description

This presentation, created by the McMaster Institute for Transportation and Logistics (MITL), paints a picture of how Hamilton, Ontario, Canada is set to evolve as a successful gateway city for Southern Ontario and beyond. This video builds on MITL's study: A Sustainable Strategy for Developing Hamilton as a Gateway.

This condensed version is narrated by the Mayor of Hamilton, Bob Bratina, and has a strong focus on Hamilton's opportunity to evolve as a gateway. The extended version (20 minutes) is narrated by Dr. Virginia Frisk and also has a Hamilton focus but is designed more for educational purposes. It goes into detail about goods movement and what a gateway is. It also contains some case studies of other successful gateway cities.